Educational Information

alt

A Natural History of the Honey Bee - presented by Evan Davies to the state Master Naturalist's conference.

To download the PowerPoint presentation for viewing click here.

At the May 2013 CBA meeting we exhibited a wooden hive stand in response to several requests for low-cost, non-cement block hivestand ideas.  Here is a simple stand that is sturdy, costs about $13 (as of June 2013), and works well with screened bottom boards.

It starts with four 1 foot lengths of 4x4.   You can also cut them into 18" sections - that just  means your hives will be about 19.5 inchs off the ground, rather than 13.5 as this one is. 

Then you cut 4 pieces of 2x4 at 18.5 inches, and 2 pieces of 2x4 at 22 inches.  The longer pieces go across the front and back, and 2 of the 4 smaller pieces form the sides, to the INTERIOR of the 4x4s.  The remaining 2 smaller pieces connect the 4x4s at the bottom, front to  back.  This stand is sized for 8-frame hives to fit onto the side pieces but drop all debris through the center hole. Ten frame hives will fit onto the stand, but if you wanted the same clear debris drop, you would add about 2.5 inches to the front and back crossmembers. Use a strong wood glue and several 3" decking screws to put it together.

 

A diagram looking down from above shows the assembly as:


22222222222222222222222222222222222222

444418                                                    184444
444418                                                    184444
444418                                                    184444
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
       18                                                    18
444418                                                    184444
444418                                                    184444
444418                                                    184444
22222222222222222222222222222222222222

where 222 is a 22" piece
and 18 is a 18.5" piece
and 444 is the 4x4
 

Day 1, Thursday, 28 MAR 13:
"Beekeeping and the WWW" - To download the PowerPoint presentation click here.
To download just the links click here.


##########################################################

Day 2, Thursday, 07 APR 13:
"Honey Bee Biology" - To download the PowerPoint presentation click here.

"Getting Started in Beekeeping" - To download the PowerPoint presentation click here.


##########################################################

 

alt

Free On-line pdf version is downloaded with this link.

##########################################################

 

Day 3, Thursday, 11 APR 13:

"Hive Inspection & Overview of Yearly Management" - To download the PowerPoint presentation click here.

Download the presented hive inspection checklist with explanations by clicking here.

##########################################################

 

Day 4, Thursday, 18 APR 13:

"Mites, Pests and Diseases" - To download the PowerPoint presentation click here.



##########################################################

 

Day 5, Saturday, 20 APR 13:

Download the presented Field Day Inspection Task Listby clicking here.

alt

Sanitation and Labeling Presentations - presented by Sarah Dunn of VDACS at the February meeting of Colonial Beekeepers Association

To view or download the PowerPoint presentation or any of the supporting references click here.



Here are some files you can view and/or download to find lists of annual and perennial plants that are beneficial to honey bees with nectar and pollen along with bloom times. My lawn mower isn't broken, I'm raising these weeds!

Honey Bee Plants for Virginia.

Habitat Improvement With Installed Bee Pastures.

This regional guide http://pollinator.org/PDFs/Guides/OuterCoastalrx7FINAL.pdf from pollinator.org covers the Virginia Peninsula and Middle Peninsula areas. Starting on page 16 you can see the bloom periods for beneficial pollinator plants but there is a lot of additional great information within.

Here is a spreadsheet file you can view and/or download to assist you in using a Cloake Board and making up a schedule to make queens by the grafting method. I adapted this from the Susquehanna Valley Beekeepers Association webpage. Good luck and if you have any questions you can call!

PETE

Grafting Schedule.

Here is a spreadsheet file you can view and/or download to assist you in creating a NUC and determining the queens development. I adapted this from the Susquehanna Valley Beekeepers Association webpage. Good luck and if you have any questions you can call!

PETE

NUC_QueenRearingCalendar.

 

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

March Meetings
and Events

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

March 12 & 13

10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Williamsburg Home Show

 

March 15th

6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Monthly Club Meeting

 

March 17th

6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Beginning Beekeeping
Day 1

 

March 24th

6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Beginning Beekeeping
Day 2

 

March 31st

6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Beginning Beekeeping
Day 3

 

 

 

 

Follow the "Upcoming Events" or "Latest News" link under the Main Menu for more information.

 

 

 

saving-the-honeybee_1.jpg

NewBees Corner

 

Information listed here is for the new beekeepers looking for new information and guidance on beekeeping and beekeeping chores:

 

++++++++++++++++++++

 

Watching the 10 day weather forecasts? Spring is upon us! The maples are blooming, that purple stuff is coming up all over my yard, the bees are bring in pollen and surely some nectar. The 15 day forecast has the daytime temps in the 50's, 60's and even 70's and more importantly the nighttime temps are in the 40's and 50's. Those colonies are going to start building up. Time to get busy. Two hive manipulations to consider in these next couple of weeks are "Opening the Broodnest" and/or "Rotating Hive Bodies". If opening/expanding the brood nest I would caution to start slowly here in March but become familiar with the technique and get more agressive in April and May. Another thing to consider is adding supers at this time. A good discussion of adding supers early is given by Walt Wright in "Nectar Management 101". Here we go!

 

++++++++++++++++++++