Title 3.2 – AGRICULTURE, ANIMAL CARE, AND FOOD
(Click on this link to view this Code of Virginia on the Virginia General Assembly Information System website.)

Chapter 44 – Beekeeping

Read more: Virginia Beekeeping Regulations

“Where Do Bees Come From” – presentation by Andy Westrich at the February meeting of Colonial Beekeepers Association

To download the PowerPoint presentation click here.

“Feeding for Spring Buildup” – presentation by Pete Ostrowski at the February meeting of Colonial Beekeepers Association

To download the PowerPoint presentation click here.

 

 

For a printer friendly text file click here.

(This presentation uses the poster set, available from the club, as a visual aid.)

INTRODUCTION:

INTRODUCE SELF AS BEEKEEPER AND MEMBER OF CLUB

USING POSTER ASK FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
1. HOW MANY LEGS DOES A BEE HAVE? (SIX)
2. HOW MANY WINGS DOES A BEE HAVE? (FOUR)
3. HOW MANY EYES DOES A BEE HAVE? (FIVE)

Read more: Sample Presentation Agenda

 

This small vacuum makes capturing Small Hive Beetles (SHB) quick and easy. The nozzle portion is removable for placing in the freezer for final disposal of these pests. Every SHB removed is one less mating or laying eggs!

I purchased mine in Bed, Bath & Beyond but it may be available other places. This is a link to the Dirt Devil website where the unit can be mail ordered for the same price I paid locally.

 

You can make a Robbing Screen very simply. You don’t need to buy/order anything. Bend some screen wire (window screen will work) in the shape of a “W” and staple it across the reduced entrance. Extend it 3-4 inches or more on either side of the opening. Install it early in the morning before the bees come out or late in the evening when the bees are in. Install it immediately in order to stop robbing, don’t wait!! The bees that live there will figure out how to get back in, the bees that want to rob the hive will try to go straight in and get stopped by the screen.

Read more: How to Make a Robbing Screen

 

Living on the Virginia Peninsula means that, as a beekeeper, you will be subject to flyover insecticide spraying by Air Force C-130 aircraft during the summer months. This is a mosquito abatement procedure, but the insecticide used is toxic to honey bees as well as the intended mosquitos.  The CBA will try to keep  you informed of the location and occurrence of these flights by email announcements to club members.  If you are a new beekeeper, you may wonder what kind of protection is necessary or practical for your beehives.

It usuallys takes the Air Force three days to cover the Peninsula area. Their schedule has _generally_ been the following:

First day – Hampton, Buckroe, Fox Hill, Poquoson, Langley and southern Newport Newport News

Second day – Southern York County and Mid Newport News

Third day – Northern York County, Northern Newport News and Fort Eustis

 

Read more: Protecting Bees Against Aerial Spraying 

 

At the June 2009 meeting, the following Powerpoint presentation about Bees at the White House was presented. It is listed here for your re-use as an educational tool.

Bees at the White House

 

Making Nucs & Splits and Queen Rearing
for the Hobby Beekeeper

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To download the PowerPoint file click here.
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Why rear your own queens?
•      Self Sustainability
•      Make up for Winter Losses
•       Increase in hive numbers

Read more: Making Nucs & Splits and Queen Rearing

 

Making Fondant for Winter Feeding


Here is a link to a video that provides the recipe and shows how to make fondant for winter feeding.

For a printer friendly text file click here.

Utensils Needed

Heavy sauce pan with lid
Extra Pot
Stirring Spoon
Candy thermometer
Electric mixer
Disposable molds (foil lined paper plates work well)

Ingredients

4 lb bag of sugar
8 cups sugar (4# bag)
2 cups water
½ teaspoon white vinegar

5 lb bag of sugar
10 cups sugar (5# bag)
2-1/2 cups water
1/2 + 1/8 teaspoon white vinegar

(Doubled recipe works for either 4# or 5# bags making about 6 each 9″ plates 1/2″ deep)

Procedure

1. Pour all ingredients into sauce pan and bring to boil stirring constantly
2. Cover and boil 5 minutes
3. Insert candy thermometer and boil until temperature reaches 234°
4. Remove from heat and cool to 200° (putting pot into sink full of water will speed this up!)
5. Whip with electric mixer until mixture begins to turn white with air bubbles throughout (3-4 minutes on the timer)
6. Pour into molds and allow to cool undisturbed
7. Store in a dry location (freezer is a good place)

 

Here is a link to a video that shows how to use powdered sugar to dust a colony for varroa mite control.

Some equipment needed

Powdered Sugar, 3/4 cup per medium super, 1 cup per deep super
Window screen or flour shifter
Measuring cup
Brush
Usual hive inspection equipment

NOTES:

Colony must be on a screened bottom board

Current technique is to not break colonies apart but apply appropriate amount of sugar through top super

Notice in video that I forgot to brush sugar off the frame top bars. You need to get the sugar down between the frames!